Boxing Training | Commando Boxing - How to Box

Boxing Training

The articles here are your boxing training fundamentals. They cover both physical and mental boxing technique.

These boxing training articles and lessons aim to give you a solid foundation on which to grow.

Study, learn, and practice these boxing basics to accelerate your boxing training. Contact Coach Aaron if there is a boxing training fundamental you feel should be included here.


10 Technique Errors All Boxers Should Watch Out For


Photo by Dan Porcutan
Weak Technique = Weak Boxer

Learning how to box on your own has the downside of not having an experienced coach watching you to correct any errors in technique. That is a bit of an annoyance, but you may be surprised to know that even experienced boxers with a coach in their corner will frequently ignore basic principles - especially when boxing against less experienced boxers. They believe they don't have to be as diligent and that because they are stronger than their opponent the deviations will do little harm.

Whether you are a new boxer or an experienced one, bad technique, no matter how small quickly adds up to nagging little habits that are difficult to correct. At some point they become weaknesses that your opponent can exploit...

10 Technique Errors All Boxers Should Watch Out For


Photo by Dan Porcutan
Weak Technique = Weak Boxer

Learning how to box on your own has the downside of not having an experienced coach watching you to correct any errors in technique. That is a bit of an annoyance, but you may be surprised to know that even experienced boxers with a coach in their corner will frequently ignore basic principles - especially when boxing against less experienced boxers. They believe they don't have to be as diligent and that because they are stronger than their opponent the deviations will do little harm.

Whether you are a new boxer or an experienced one, bad technique, no matter how small quickly adds up to nagging little habits that are difficult to correct. At some point they become weaknesses that your opponent can exploit...

Training the Boxer's Mind


Ready To Deal With This?
Photo by Greencolander

It is totally possible for you to train like a boxer and end up looking like a boxer - complete with six pack abs, zero fat, and lean muscle - but looking like a boxer and having the fitness level of a boxer will not automatically make you a great fighter.

The really great boxers train their minds as much or more than they train their bodies.

Training the body is the easy part. The human body responds the same way in most people. It will increase in strength, speed, and endurance by training in a specific way. Over time, with consistency, your fitness level improves.

Your mind is not so easy to deal with but it is a crucial part of the total boxing equation.

Becoming a fierce competitor takes more than a strong body - you need the mindset of a champion and few people are actually born with that mindset. You have to prepare your mind for combat - to help control emotions and do away with worry, fear, and despair.

Injury Free Boxing Training

Boxing training is extremely rewarding. Hitting something over and over just feels really good - some days even more so than others... But, if you don't take the proper precautions and use proper technique, you risk injuring yourself. An injury will instantly affect your training even if it is a small one. So, before you start swinging - at minimum ensure you've got these four points covered.

Note that I'm only covering training you do by yourself here. If you're sparring, you have more things to consider.

Boxing Defense

Taking a punch is a personal thing and you'll know your opinion on it immediately after receiving your first one. A lot of it is mental but you'll have to deal with it however you can, especially if you want to compete.

Some people can not handle getting hit, it immediately induces panic and instincts of flight while other people can get hit by what seems like a truck, shake it off, well up with anger and present a flurry of hurt.

The truth of the matter is that with 16 oz gloves, headgear, and an ounce of skill there is little chance you are going to be seriously hurt. Full speed blows to the head are absorbed quite well while blows to the ribs will probably cause bruising. Again, it all depends on who is boxing, but that is the generality of it.

The best thing to do, is learn some defense, thus minimizing the number of punches you are going to have to deal with altogether. There are quite a few things you can do to either avoid being hit altogether or at least absorb some of the incoming power so they don't do as much damage.

The T-Frame Concept

You're about to learn a little theoretical concept that will help you with more advanced techniques. If you understand a bit about weight transfer, body posture and positioning, you'll have a better chance at successfully throwing more advanced combinations without putting yourself off balance and therefore in a bad position for a counter attack.

From your boxing stance, if you look in a mirror, you'll notice that a T is formed between your shoulders and torso when you are in a correct position and have the correct posture. The stem of the T is formed by your torso and the cross of the T is formed by your shoulders. A correctly formed T without warps in the stem or slants left or right in the T is what you are striving for at all times. It doesn't mean you need to keep the T from being deformed at all times. It is a flexible T. It just means that you always want to return to the normal T. Consider it a T made out of rubber that will reform once you stop bending it.

The Pivot Principle

A big misconception people have about boxing is that the bigger you are the more powerful you are. While muscular strength certainly adds to your potential to generate power, it is far more effective to generate force by increasing acceleration and speed to propel the bigger mass at your target. So, if you're wondering how to add some power to your punches -   Do you go to the gym and bulk up the triceps and biceps?  Do you do speed drills on the heavy bag to get your arms moving faster?  Do you pick up 3lb dumb bells and shadowbox?

You could do some or all of the above, but a more effective way to increase your punching power and speed is to master the pivot principle.

What Are You Looking At?

You learned how to get into a boxing stance - how your feet are positioned to give you a nice strong base, knees bent, weight distributed evenly over balls of your feet, elbows tucked in protecting your body, and hands positioned up by your cheek bones to protect your chin. Your head is tilted forward bringing your chin into your chest and you're looking up through your eyebrows - but where exactly are you looking?

There is no hard and fast rule that says you have to look at one certain place on your opponent, however, depending on the skill of your opponent, watching certain spots on his/her body can give you a marked advantage or disadvantage.

The Left Hook (3)

The left hook will drive you nuts in the beginning. It takes a lot of practice to be able to throw correctly and get some power behind it. It is a power punch, though, so once you have the mechanics down, you can do a lot of damage with it. All of the power, like any of the punches, comes from the rotation in your hip. The more vicious a rotation you make, the more snap you're going to get in the punch.

The Straight Right or Left (2)

Moving right along, here's another boxing lesson for you. I trust you've been having some fun with the jab over the last couple of days, but it's probably getting a bit boring as well.

Now we'll add another punch to your offensive arsenal - the straight right.

For southpaw boxers, the straight right is actually the straight left (left cross). Whether you are orthodox or southpaw, I very much believe you are going to like this lesson, simply because you are going to be the most comfortable with this punch. It is the one punch everyone has probably used throughout their life, whether it was in fights, playing with your brothers/sisters, or teasing your boyfriend/girlfriend.